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PHYSIOLOGY AND HEALTH SCIENCE


www.bsu.edu/physiology

Cooper Science Complex 325, 765-285-5961

 

The Department of Physiology and Health Science offers graduate programs leading to either the master of arts or the master of science degree in health science or in physiology. Both physiology and health science may be used as academic cognate areas for students pursuing doctoral or specialist in education programs in related disciplines.

      Although each graduate program has specific requirements, there is flexibility to meet individual student’s interests and needs. For example, a student who wants to earn a master of science degree in either physiology or health science will be required to complete a thesis. Graduate students who wish to professionalize their Indiana teaching licenses in health and safety will complete appropriate course work in the master of arts or master of science degree program in health science.




PROGRAMS

 

Master of science (MS) in health science;  master of arts (MA) and master of science (MS) in physiology.

See the Science listing under the College of Sciences and Humanities, page 180, for the doctoral programs in science education and philosophy in environmental science.

 

MASTER’S PROGRAM IN HEALTH SCIENCE

 

Admission requirements

 

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate School and must have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with at least an academic minor in health education, health and safety education, health science, or an equivalent subject. A student applying for a graduate teaching assistantship must have a grade-point average (GPA) of at least 3.0 on a scale of 4.0.

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN HEALTH SCIENCE

 

Students are expected to demonstrate a higher level of research skills in this program by completing a thesis (THES 698).

 

PREFIX   NO    SHORT TITLE     CR HRS

 

Core requirements

HSC        670   Rsearch Tech           3

               671   Research Sem          2

               687   Stat Mth HSc (3)

               or

EDPSY   641   Statist Meth (3)        3

THES      698   Thesis (1-6)             6

 

Complete one of the following tracks:

 

Community health education, 11 hours

 

HSC        585   Co Hl Mthds            4

               669   Pd HSc Pract (3-6)

               or

               675   Internship (3-6)        3

               686   Prg Pln Eval             4

 

Electives                                          2

 

School health education, 12 hours

 

HSC        563   CSHP: Org Is           3

               595   Mth Mtrl H E           3

 

6 hours from

HSC        550   El S Hlth Pg (3)

               562   Hl Pro Wkste (3)

               564   H Ed Clinic (3)

               565   Alcohol Prob (3)

               567   Drug Depn Ab (3)

               568   Con Hlth Iss (3)

               569   Health Aging (3)

               571   Death Dying (3)

               572   Women Health (3)

               581   Stress Mang (3)

               582   Environ Hlth (3)

               589   Pub Hlth Ent (3)

 

Category II or III

education courses (3)                       6

 

Electives                                          4

                                                    ———

                                                    30 hrs

 

MASTER’S PROGRAMS IN PHYSIOLOGY

 

These programs are designed for students seeking in-depth coverage of physiological principles pertaining to the human organism, endocrinology, renal function, cardiovascular dynamics, and pathophysiology.

 

Admission requirements

 

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate School and must also have a bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university with an academic major or minor in biology, the life sciences, or equivalent science fields. For students applying for graduate teaching assistantships, a GPA of at least 3.0 on a scale of 4.0 is required.

 

MASTER OF ARTS IN PHYSIOLOGY

 

Degree requirements

 

PREFIX   NO    SHORT TITLE     CR HRS

 

CHEM    563   Prn Biochm 1           3

               564   Prn Biochm 2           3

PHYSL   585   Resrch Tech             3

 

3 hours from

PHYSL   511   Endocrinolgy (3)

               513   Renal Physl (3)        3

 

3 hours from

PHYSL   514   Cardiovsculr (3)

               520   Neuroscience (3)     3

 

3-4 hours from

ANAT     525   Embryo/Histo (4)

PHYSL   590   Ad Tpc Physl (1-3) 3-4

 

ANAT or PHYSL electives

(excluding MED PHYSL 640)

(at least 3 credit hours must be in

physiology)                                      9

 

General electives                             3

                                                    ———

                                                  30-31 hrs

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE IN PHYSIOLOGY

 

Degree requirements

 

PREFIX   NO    SHORT TITLE     CR HRS

 

CHEM    563   Prn Biochm 1           3

               564   Prn Biochm 2           3

PHYSL   585   Resrch Tech             3

THES      698   Thesis (1-6)             6

 

3 hours from

PHYSL   511   Endocrinolgy (3)

               513   Renal Physl (3)        3

 

3 hours from

PHYSL   514   Cardiovsculr (3)

               520   Neuroscience (3)     3

 

3-4 hours from

ANAT     525   Embryo/Histo (4)

PHYSL   590   Ad Tpc Physl (1-3) 3-4

 

PHYSL or ANAT electives

(excluding MED PHYSL 640)

(at least 3 credit hours must be in

physiology)                                      3

 

General electives                             3

                                                    ———

                                                  30-31 hrs

 

CERTIFICATE PROGRAM IN PUBLIC HEALTH EDUCATION

 

PREFIX   NO    SHORT TITLE     CR HRS

 

HSC        585   Co Hl Mthds            4

               686   Prg Pln Eval             4

               562   Hl Pro Wkste           3

 

Electives course(s): any health-
related graduate course(s) approved
by the department chairperson         3

                                                    ———

                                                    14 hrs

                                                                       

COGNATE AREAS FOR DOCTORAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

 

Health Science Cognate

 

This 15-hour or 24-hour concentration of courses in health science and related academic disciplines is offered to qualified doctoral students who want a high level of competency in advanced content and program planning, implementation, and evaluation pertaining to health promotion and disease prevention.

 

Physiology Cognate

 

This 15-hour or 24-hour concentration of course work in physiology, anatomy, and related science disciplines is offered to qualified doctoral students who want advanced courses in body function and structure.

 

ANATOMY (ANAT)

 

505 Human Neuroanatomy. (3) A strong background in the basic structural and functional relations of the central nervous system. Emphasizes the location of nerve-cell centers and the fiber tracts entering and leaving these centers. Two two-hour laboratory periods weekly.

Prerequisite: ANAT 201 or ZOOL 330.

 

525 Human Embryology and Histology. (4) Examines human development from germ cell formation to organ formation including microscopic structure of tissue and abnormal development.

Prerequisite: BIO 111, 112 or ANAT 201 or permission of the department chair-person.

Not open to students who have credit in ANAT 425.

 

601 Human Gross Anatomy. (8) A strong background in basic morphologic and functional relations. Emphasizes regional anatomy. Four two-and-one-half hour laboratory periods weekly.

Prerequisite: admission to the medical education program.

 

606 Medical Neuroanatomy. (4) Normal structural and functional organization of the human central nervous system as a background for the interpretation of its dysfunction. Assumes prior knowledge of human peripheral nervous system and effector mechanisms. Two-and-one-half hour lecture plus four hours of laboratory weekly.

Prerequisite: ANAT 601.

 

631 Medical Histology-Embryology. (5) Normal and abnormal developmental processes related to the differentiation of tissues and organs; microscopic study of organs and tissues as background for physiological and pathological consideration.

Prerequisite: admission to the medical education program.

 

690 Special Studies in Anatomy. (1-3) Problems of special interest in anatomy or in anatomy teaching. Individual work under the direction of a staff member may involve one or more of the following: experimental work, attendance in undergraduate classes, wide reading, and development of special techniques or skills in scientific investigation.

Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.

A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

 

HEALTH SCIENCE (HSC)

 

550 Elementary School Health Programs. (3) School’s role in promoting health and preventing disease among preschool and elementary school children. Focus on the school health program (instruction, services, and environment), community resources, and health problems common to school children. No regularly scheduled laboratory.

Prerequisite: HSC 160.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 350.

 

562 Health Promotion in the Worksite. (3) Explores the major components of planning, implementing, and evaluation of health promotion programs at the worksite.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 462.

 

563 Coordinated School Health Programs: Organization and Issues. (3) Addresses the processes and issues associated with the planning, implementing, evaluating, and organizing of a coordinated school health program in accordance with national and state guidelines.

Prerequisite: HSC 261 or 467 or 471 or permission of the department chairperson.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 363.

 

564 Health Education in the Clinical Setting. (3) Theories of client education and application of the educational process to individuals and groups in a variety of health-care settings. Emphasizes the multidisciplinary team concept in planning, implementing, and evaluating client education. Application of knowledge of growth and development in meeting learning needs of clients from a variety of ages and intellectual levels.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 464.

 

565 Alcohol Problems. (3) Alcohol as a mood modifier and its use, nonuse, and abuse in drinking societies. Critical and controversial issues relevant to alcohol ingestion will be explored for medical, economic, legal, educational, historical, physiological, and public health implications.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 465.

 

567 Drug Dependence and Abuse. (3) The medical, psychological, sociological, and legal dimensions of drug use in the United States. Examines the incidence and prevalence of drug abuse along with the roles played by the school and community in dealing with this health problem.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 467.

 

568 Consumer Health Issues. (3) Health services and consumer protection organizations. Analysis of fraudulent health practices and nostrums, available health care systems, and health products.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 468.

 

569 Health and Aging. (3) Dynamics of later life and the aging process with specific emphasis on health. The physiological and behavioral dimensions of the aging process.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 469.

 

571 Death and Dying. (3) The relationship between death and health with emphasis on physiological, psychological, legal, and medical aspects of death in contemporary America. Roles of individual, family, school, community, and various professionals. Problems in meaning of death, care of the dying, death education, and attitudes toward death.

Prerequisite: HSC 160 or permission of the department chairperson.

 

572 Women and Health. (3) General overview of issues related to women and health: health needs of working women, special nutritional concerns, the gynecological exam, reproductive anatomy and physiology, fertility and infertility, breast problems, wife abuse, and rape.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 472.

 

581 Stress Management. (3) Aids in understanding the physiological, psychological, and sociological aspects of stress. Students will increase their awareness of the effects of stress, identify personal stress triggers, and develop strategies to minimizing stress throughout their daily lives.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 481.

 

582 Environmental Health. (3) Physical environment and its relationship to disease causation. Review of environmental health problems and their solutions. Areas of study include air and water pollution, food sanitation, disposal of human excreta and waste, radiation and occupational health problems, and risk.

 

585 Community Health Methods. (4) Provides the skills necessary to become effective community health educators including policy development, advocacy, coalition building, grant writing, cultural competency, fund raising, and community health assessment.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 385.

 

589 Public Health Entomology. (3) A survey of diseases caused or transmitted by insects and other arthropods. Emphasizes the recognition of medically important arthropods and their biology and control. A weekly three-hour laboratory provides an opportunity to collect and study live and preserved arthropod specimens.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 389.

 

595 Methods, Materials, and Curriculum for Teaching Health Education.  (3) Application of the roles of the health teacher in a school setting. Functions considered include needs assessment, program planning, direct instruction and evaluation, and curriculum development.

Prerequisite: EDSEC 150, 380; identification to pursue a teaching curriculum.

Not open to students who have credit in HSC 395.

 

598 Workshop in Health Science. (1-6) Critical contemporary issues in health science. May include consultants, guest lecturers, field trips, and group activities.

Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.

A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

 

669 Paid Health Science Practicum. (3-6) A paid work and learning experience in an approved health agency, facility, educational institution, professional organization, or private business for a time commensurate with the hours of credit to be earned. Assignments depend upon students’ interests and the resources of participating organizations.

Prerequisite: permission of the department coordinator of practicums and internships.

A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

 

670 Health Science Research Techniques. (3) An introduction to the study and practical application of research design as it applies to the health sciences. Emphasizes the necessary skills and competencies required to develop an acceptable research proposal.

 

671 Research Seminar. (2) Review, analysis, and discussion of the literature related to selected topics of current interest in health science. Includes public presentation of research proposal.

Prerequisite: HSC 670.

Open only to students enrolled in health science master’s degree programs.

 

675 Internship in Health Science. (3-6) Assignment to an approved health agency or educational institution for a period of time commensurate with the hours of credit to be earned. The student will make periodic and final reports to an academic advisor and to the administrator of the participating agency.

Prerequisite: permission of the department coordinator of practicums and internships.

A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned.

 

683 Principles of Epidemiology. (3) Introduction to the epidemiological perspective on health and disease. Emphasizes the principles and methods used to describe and evaluate the patterns of contemporary health problems in communities and population subgroups. Methods and research designs used in the investigation of the etiological causes of disease are presented.

 

686 Health Promotion Program Planning and Evaluation. (4) Advanced study of program development, implementation, and evaluation. Includes an in-depth examination of the theories, models, and techniques/methods associated with these processes.

 

687 Statistical Theory and Methods in Health Science. (3) Designed for the application of statistics in health science. Focuses on statistical reasoning and techniques required for the analysis and interpretation of data in health science research.

 

695 Seminar in Health Science. (3-9) Selected literature on current scientific research. Extensive reading in scientific journals. Seminar members report at stated intervals on assigned problems in health science or health science teaching.

A total of 9 hours of credit may be earned.

 

697 Special Studies in Health Science.

(1-3) Problems of special interest in health science or in health science teaching. Individual work under the direction of a staff member may involve one or more of the following: experimental work, attendance in undergraduate classes, wide reading, and development of special techniques or skills in scientific investigation.

Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.

A total of 6 hours of credit may be earned, but no more than 3 in any one semester or term.

 

PHYSIOLOGY (PHYSL)

 

511 Endocrinology. (3) Endocrine functions in humans and mammals with special emphasis on mechanisms. Normal hormone regulation and pathophysiological principles. Laboratory experience with small mammal surgery and endocrine testing. One three-hour laboratory period weekly.

Prerequisite: ANAT 201; one year of general chemistry.

 

513 Renal Physiology. (3) Detailed study of the urinary system and excretory functions. Emphasizes human physiology but includes comparative vertebrate systems. Laboratory study includes gross, microscopic anatomy, and small mammal surgery. One three-hour laboratory a week.

      Prerequisite: one course each in chemistry, anatomy, and physiology or permission of the instructor.

 

514 Cardiovascular Physiology. (3) A study of the dynamics of the human cardiovascular system, stressing applications of basic physical principles and the operation of physiological regulatory systems. Includes seminar-style discussion of recent literature.

Prerequisite: one course in physiology.

Not open to students who have credit in PHYSL 414.

 

515 Physiology of Aging. (3) Study of how physiological systems change with age and the mechanisms that are thought to cause these changes. Disorders and diseases of aging will be covered.

      Prerequisite: one course each in chemistry and physiology or permission of the instructor.

 

516 Human Toxicology. (3) Chemical, physical, zoological, and botanical toxicoses in human health. The implications and methodology of dealing with hazardous substances and poisons.

Prerequisite: CHEM 101 or 111, and 112; one year of biology or physiology or combination of both; or permission of the instructor.

Not open to students who have credit in PHYSL 416.

 

520 Neuroscience. (3) Introductory study of the organization and function of the nervous system. Emphasizes integration of the structure and function of the nervous system.

Prerequisite: one year of chemistry and one year of biology or physiology.

 

535 Pathophysiology. (3) The physiological pathology of selected disease processes and dysfunctions. The pathogenesis of certain derangements with broad applicability. Underlying chemical, biological, and physical mechanisms. Laboratory experience will include demonstrations, visitations, and specimen study. One three-hour laboratory period weekly.

Prerequisite: one course each in anatomy, physiology, and chemistry.

Not open to students who have credit in PHYSL 435.

 

585 Research Techniques in Physiology. (3) Introduction to experimental design, laboratory techniques, and data analysis and interpretation in anatomy and physiology. Laboratory will include methods employing animal preparations, modern cellular/ molecular techniques, and general histological procedures. Introduction to computer data acquisition and analysis.

Prerequisite: one course in physiology or permission of the instructor; CHEM 563 recommended.

 

590 Advanced Topics in Physiology. (1-3) Involves discussion of current topics in research as well as exploring current laboratory techniques and advances in molecular and cellular aspects of physiology.

Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.

A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

 

640 Medical Physiology. (8) Summary of human physiology for medical students. Cellular and organ-system physiology; physiological regulation. Laboratory exercises will demonstrate general principles of physiology and introduce basic techniques and instrumentation.

Prerequisite: admission to the medical education program.

 

645 Emergency Medicine. (2) Designed to develop an awareness of proper diagnosis and treatment during emergency medical care by professional medical personnel. Fractures; environmental emergencies; injuries to the eye, chest, and abdomen; shock; and wound care.

Prerequisite: admission to the medical education program.

 

690 Special Studies in Physiology. (1-3) Problems of special interest in physiology or in physiology teaching. Individual work under the direction of a staff member may involve one or more of the following: experimental work, attendance in undergraduate classes, wide reading, and development of special techniques or skills in scientific investigation.

Prerequisite: permission of the department chairperson.

A total of 3 hours of credit may be earned.

 

SCIENCE (SCI)

 

501 Electron and Confocal Microscopy. (3) Introduction to the techniques and theory of electron and confocal microscopy. Emphasizes basic procedures employed in specimen preparation, production of micrographs and operation of the transmission, scanning, and confocal microscopes.